Blog Carnival

Widgets are machine components, tables are hoard components!

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It’s important to note that there are many types of loot that can go into a Hoard. And it can really define the purpose and therefore the plot potential of the loot. Last week we looked at the different types of hoards. We learned that; A noble is going to have a different hoard then a goblin who is going too have a different hoard then a dragon who will also have a different hoard then the treasury of the local bishop. The components are going to be very different. But what if you find that the Goblin Hoard is made up of the same components as what you’d expect from the local bishop? Now you have a plot point. What if the bishop has a hoard of weapons? Well that’s a new plot point. This is what we really like about random treasure generation, it makes the world come a live. It simulates life, as long as there are rules that are followed.

1d20 Treasure Component Description
1 Alcohol Dwarven Ale, Elvish wine, they are all expensive and collectible
2 Armor Collections of armor types, Shields, Helmets, bracers
3 Art Objects If it’s Art, it’s Treasure!
4 Clothing Princely Robes, to Exotic Suits, to the Hats of the Bards Guild
5 Coin Numismatics!
6 Craft tools Hammers, Anvils, Apothecary Labs, they are treasure too!
7 Furniture Thrones, expensive Chests, Pillows stuffed with Pixie wings
8 Household Wares I’ve never understood spoon collections, but Crystal Ware and China
9 Jewelry Durh
10 Library If money is power, and knowledge is power, A = B and C = B then A = C
11 Magical Miscellany Magical Ingredients can be treasure
12 Potions Consumable Treasure! Finally!
13 Professional Tools A Carter, or Fisherman might be buried with their mode of transportation
14 Raw Materials 100 tons of ore is loot, heavy and cumbersome, but it’s still loot
15 Religious Artifacts Reliquaries, incense, Altar clothing
16 Weapon The Biggest collection of AWL Pikes?!? That’s the best ever!
17 Zoological Statues, bones, egg shards, animals are important.
18

19

20

It annoys me that I was only able to get 17 ideas for components. It’s not even a die! But there it’s 17 components to make your treasure hoard interesting. In upcoming episodes we will flesh these components out and continue to grow our understanding of what our hoard is going to be.

TST: Numismatics

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A TableSmith Tuesday post!  Huzzah!  I have returned.  That thing called work, interrupted me yet again, but I am an amateur blogger so it comes and goes.  Originally the idea had been to be finished with Graveyard.tab in time for Halloween, but that fell through.  Right now I am determined to work finish this new ‘Hoard Project’ for the Month of October.  As part of the October RPG Blog Carnival.  Here is the first TableSmith Tuesday post on the project.  You can get the Table here.

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October RPG Blog Carnival Challenge

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Two thoughts intersected this afternoon in my head. My first thought and the foreword to my first Random Table post in a while was this:

After reading so many posts on the Loot edition of the carnival, and the many naysayers, I set myself out this month to publish 2 tables a week about loot. I am setting out to show that the basic humdrum tables normally found around, of course are not going to be very helpful, and are going to give you well, random loot. But by building tables with a purpose, and rules, you can build an emergent story from the random table.

The second thought was earlier this morning when I read about the NaGaDeMon. Which intersected nicely with a project that I was going to begin working on this month.  So I am challenging myself to create a set of tables, and a system to help create a Hoard.

So, here’s what I am going to do for October, I am going to publish posts under a subject I will call The Hoard. The goal of this will be to pull together the many aspects of a treasure hoard, give it rules, and guidelines, and create a cohesive story (and Stat Block) about the treasure hoard. I will use the TST column with this project to be able to produce a table that you can use at anytime to generate your own Hoard.

The Hoard Project:

  1.  Origins
    1. Creation
    2. Accumulation
    3. Provenance
  2.  Loot
    1. Coin Piles
    2. Decoratives
    3. Trade Goods
    4. Mundanes
    5. Miscellaneous
  3. Consequences
    1. Economic
    2. Social
    3. Physical

I’d be remiss if I didn’t mention that while doing some research on this project that I came across ALMOST EXACTLY what I wanted to do.  That Document comes from Hack Slash.  Proving that Random Tables can be used to create an interesting cohesive treasure.

Rites of Passage of the RandomDM

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Due to the EPIC move of the RandomDM, my regular posting schedule has been interrupted.  The plan had been to post this shortly after the Death Rites table, but it is a little more poetic that at the beginning of the month I posted Death Rites during the Life and Death in RPG Carnival blog, and at the end of the Month I post this, the positive side of Life; Life Events.

When you want to add a little more flavor to a small town or a religious order, or a culture one of the best things to design is a rite of passage, and how it affects their lives.  Take for example Catholicism, Baptism and Confirmation are celebrated events.  In Judaism the Bris and Bar Mitzvah are the same.  In Indian culture Betrothal is a celebrated event.  These define the culture and actions of a group of people.

An event like Marriage is a lot more complex then should be limited to one simple custom.  In these cases I would suggest breaking the ceremony into acts.  Roll on the tables of mood, length, and customs for each act of the ceremony.  This adds an interesting complexity and can provide some difficult theoretical exercise on how you have a wild and chaotic sacrifice during the second act of a marriage.

1d12 Life Events 1d6 Mood
1 Birth 1 Festive
2 Entering Covenant with God (Think Baptism, Bris) 2 Somber
3 Surviving too Childhood 3 Strict
4 Induction into Religion (Bar Mitzvah, Communion) 4 Chaotic and Wild
5 Sexual Maturation 5 Celebatory
6 Apprenticeship 6 Mournful
7 Coming of Age
8 Marriage
9 Birth of Child
10 Aging from Adult to Elder
11 Leaving Home
12 Betrothal
1d8 Participants 1d4 Length of Rite
1 Immediate Family 1 d6 x 10 minutes
2 Extended Family 2 1 Day
3 Religious Group 3 1d6 hours
4 Community Members 4 1d6 Days
5 Guild Members
6 Strangers
7 Male Members (of 1d6 Participants)
8 Female Members (of 1d6 Participants)
1d10 Customs
1 Giving of gifts
2 Symbolic Destruction of previous life
3 Animal Sacrifice
4 Feast
5 Dance Ritual
6 Processional through Community
7 Symbolic Rebirth
8 Prayer
9 Reading of Ceremonial Texts
10 Secret Induction Rite

Burial Customs of the RandomDM

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RPG BLOG CARNIVAL this month is focused on Life and Death in RPG.  The Contribution here at the RandomDM is simple and inspired.  A random table to quickly create and inspire death rites for your games.  Talk circles around how festivals and holidays can add depth and breadth to your game.  So can the simple act of death. 

The act of celebrating death has given us three of the Wonders of the World.  The Pyramids, the Taj Mahal, and the Mausoleum of Halicarnassus.  It has given us stories of great deeds and games leading to establishment of gladiatorial combats. 

So here it is, a table that can help you easily and quickly come up with funeral rites for your game.

2d4-1 GRAVE TYPE 1d6 MOURNING PERIOD
1 Set out to sea 1 1d10 Days
2 Mausoleum 2 1d6 x 10 Days
3 Tomb 3 1d4 Weeks
4 Grave 4 1 Year
5 Crypt 5 7 Days
6 Left out to the element 6 1d4 Months
7 Under a tree    
       
1d8 BURIAL GOODS 1d4 LENGTH OF SERVICE
1 Household Goods 1 d6 x 10 minutes
2 Trinkets 2 Day
3 Food 3 1d6 hours
4 Jewelry 4 1d6 Days
5 Furniture    
6 Spouse    
7 Pets    
8 Armor/Weapons    
       
       
1d10 CUSTOMS
1 Interred in a site no more than 1 hour journey from the location of death
2 Body remains in the home of the deceased until immediately before service
3 Remains are oriented towards the ‘Holy Site’
4 Ritual washing of the body
5 Watchers stay with the body around the clock until the service
6 Crying out, wails are expected from the bereaved
7 Animal sacrifice
8 Smoking during a funeral service to keep evil spirits away from the newly released soul
9 Holy symbol must be interred with the remains
10 Offered to a beast for consumption
       
1d8 EXTRAS
1 Buried with Goods
2 Spells for preserving body
3 Release Ceremony, 10 days after the funeral there is a release ceremony to release
  the soul from earth
4 After the mourning period speaking the deads name could summon their soul back
  to earth
5 Destruction of the deceased goods, to release them from earthly bonds
6 Turning of the bones, every 7 years a graveyard is dug up and the bones are danced
  with to shake the remains of the soul off the bones
7 Funeral Games held to distribute the earthly goods of the deceased
8 Feast to celebrate the life and stories hosted by the family to proclaim the greatness
  of the deceased
1d6 FUNERAL PROCESSION
1 The Family carries the remains
2 Animals carry the remains
3 Male members of the family carry the remains
4 Female family members carry the remains
5 Strangers carry the remains
6 None